Maisto 1:18 2014 Corvette C7 Stingray

Throwing off the constraints of tradition, Chevrolet world-class engineers started over from scratch to build a revolutionary lightweight vehicle with the aesthetic impact and the performance prowess worthy of the Stingray emblem. With its sculpted athletic exterior and driver-oriented cockpit, Stingray is a beautiful weapon against the ordinary. The Chevrolet Corvette (C7) is a sports car being produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors introduced for the 2014 model year. It is the seventh generation Corvette and the first to bear the Corvette Stingray name since the 1976 third generation model.


Entering the 1950s, no corporation even came close to General Motors in its size, the scope of its enterprise or its profits. GM was twice as big as the second biggest company in the world, Standard Oil of New Jersey (forefather of today's ExxonMobil), and had a vast conglomeration of businesses ranging from home appliances to providing insurance and building Buicks, Cadillacs, Chevrolets, GMCs, Oldsmobiles, Pontiacs and locomotives. It was so big that it made more than half the cars sold in the United States and the U.S. Department of Justice's antitrust division was threatening to break it up. In the diversified 21st century, it's almost hard to imagine how overwhelmingly concentrated corporate power was in GM back then.

But it didn't make a sports car. The idea of a car coming from stodgy GM that could compete with Jaguar, MG or Triumph was almost absurd.

Still, there was room inside GM for dreams even if there wasn't any room for whimsy. Harley J. Earl, GM's chief designer (formally the head of the Art and Color Section) and the man who invented the "concept car" with the 1938 Buick Y-Job, was in charge of the corporation's ambitious musings. In the fall of 1951, Earl began ruminating about an open sports car that would sell for around the price of a mainstream American sedan: about $2,000. His ideas were rather nebulous, but he handed those notions over to Robert F. McLean, the concept came into focus and a car based upon that emerged.

Determined to keep costs down, McLean used off-the-shelf Chevy mechanical components. The chassis and suspension were for all intents and purposes the 1952 Chevy sedan's, with the drivetrain and passenger compartment shoved rearward to achieve a 53/47 front-to-rear weight distribution over its 102-inch wheelbase. The engine was essentially the same dumpy inline-6 that powered all Chevys but with a higher compression ratio, triple Carter side-draft carbs and a more aggressive cam that hauled its output up to 150 horsepower. Fearful that no Chevy manual three-speed transmission could handle such extreme power (there were no four-speeds in GM's inventory), a two-speed Powerglide automatic was bolted behind the hoary six. And to keep tooling costs in line, the body was made out of fiberglass instead of steel.

While the car was conceived with rigorous attention to the bottom line and production feasibility in mind, it was still only intended to be part of GM's Motorama exhibit at the 1953 New York Auto Show. That is until Ed Cole, Chevy's recently appointed chief engineer, saw it. Cole, then immersed in development of the world-changing 1955 "small-block" V8, is said to have literally jumped up and down with enthusiasm for the Motorama car. So before it even got to New York, and after some corporate machinations, the engineering to put it into production began.

But first Cole needed to name it. So he called Myron Scott, founder of the All-American Soap Box Derby and an assistant advertising manager for Chevrolet, into a special meeting of executives researching the name. Scott suggested "Corvette," Cole loved it and the rest is history.

The public at the New York show loved the 1953 Motorama Corvette almost as much as Cole did. Thousands of potential buyers wanted to know when they could buy one. Just six months later, they could. The 1953 Corvette, virtually identical to the Motorama prototype, entered production on June 30, 1953, in Flint, Michigan.

GM has been making them ever since.

Development and introduction

According to Motor Trend, GM executives have been planning the next-generation (C7) Corvette since 2007, and officially revealed it in Detroit at 7 pm EST on January 13, 2013. The car was originally planned for the 2011 model year, but was delayed, and currently expected to arrive in fall 2013 in the 2014 model year. Mid-engine and rear-engine layouts had been considered, but the front-engine, rear-wheel drive (RWD) platform was chosen to keep costs lower. The C7's all-new LT1 6.2L Small Block V-8 engine is expected to increase the overall speed, while also increasing the overall fuel economy from the previous 2013's 26 MPG highway rating. This engine develops 455 horsepower (339 kW) and 460 lb.-ft. of torque (624 Nm), which gives it a 0-60 time of 3.8 seconds.


Over the years, the Corvette has won awards from automobile publications as well as organizations such as the Society of Automotive Engineers.
  • Automobile Magazine ranked the 1963–1967 Sting Ray first on their "100 Coolest Cars" list, above the Dodge Viper GTS, the Porsche 911, and others. In 2013, Automobile Magazine had selected the Corvette C7 as its "Automobile of the Year".
  • Sports Car International placed the Corvette at number 5 on their list of the "Top Sports Cars of the 1960s".
  • Hot Rod magazine in its March 1986 issue selected the 1973–74 Corvette LS6 454 as one of the "10 most collectable muscle cars" in the company of the 1968–70 Chevelle, 1970 'Cuda, 1970 Challenger, 1966–67 Fairlane, 1968–70 AMX, 1970 Camaro Z28, 1968–70 GTO, 1968–69 Charger, and 1967–68 Mustang.
  • Car and Driver readers selected the Corvette "Best all around car" nine out of eleven years in Car and Driver's Reader's Choice Polls including 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, and 1975.
  • Car and Driver magazine selected the Corvette for its annual Ten Best list sixteen times: the C4 from 1985 through 1989, the C5 in 1998, 1999, and 2002 through 2004, the C6 from 2005 through 2009, and the C7 in 2014.
  • Motor Trend magazine named the Corvette Car of the Year in 1984 and 1998.
  • Society of Automotive Engineers publication Automotive Engineering International selected the 1999 Corvette Convertible, (along with the Mercedes-Benz S500) "Best Engineered Car of the 20th century".
  • The 2005 Corvette was nominated for the North American Car of the Year award and was named "Most Coveted Vehicle" in the 2006 Canadian Car of the Year contest.
  • U.S. News & World Report selected the 2010 Corvette the "Best Luxury Sports Car for the Money".
  • Edmunds.com, in its "100 Best Cars Of All Time" list, ranked the 1963 Corvette Stingray as the 16th best car ever produced worldwide. The 1990 ZR1 took #50, the 1955 Corvette V8 took #72, and the 2009 ZR1 took #78 overall.
  • "The 2014 Corvette was nominated for the North American Car of the Year award, and won it from its great performance."

Love the 2014 Corvette Stingray? Then show your love with the Maisto Special Edition Diecast 1:18 2014 Corvette Stingray. Maisto brings you highly detailed models that are made out of die cast metal and high quality plastic parts. This highly detailed diecast 1:18th scale model looks exactly like the real thing. All the car doors, hood and trunk can be opened. The steering wheel actually turns the front wheels left and right. It's these details along with a realistic chassis and exhaust that make Maisto models stand out from the rest. The Maisto Special Edition Diecast 1:18 2014 Corvette Stingray makes a excellent conversation piece, well-suited for decorating your home, office or showroom!

Key Features:

  • Doors, Hood and Trunk Open
  • Steerable wheels that roll
  • High quality diecast

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